Usage and Testing

 

So here’s my HTC One with the Power Jacket and the case is slightly lager that the phone and not quite twice as thick.

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To get your phone in you have to carefully line it up wit the microUSB port and then push it down towards the clip on the top of the case and it lock into place.

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Here’s the top view and for the most part it’s wide open allowing access to the audio jack and power button. Here you can see the clip on the case holding the phone in place.

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On the right side is the volume control and it’s fully open for easy access.

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On the left side of the HTC One is where the micro Sim card slot is and the case still allows access to it even when closed.

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When the phone is in the case you really can’t tell with the cover closed.

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The area around the camera and flash is nice and wide provided an unobstructed view for the camera.

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The case does not always charge the HTC One, you’ll need to slide the switch from off to on and it will begin charging the phone. There is a small LED under the ‘Charge’ label that comes on to let you know it’s working. The LEDs under the battery indicators do not light up until you press the power button.

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Charging time varies on how much battery capacity is left in the phone but it seems to charge as fast as if you were charging via the regular USB connection.

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Since it’s a switch that turns the battery charging function on it won’t turn off automatically. When the phone is fully charged I’m guessing here that the case will just slow to a trickle style charging function. It doesn’t actually say that but it does say that the there is circuitry built-in to prevent overcharging and that’s usually what that means, a trickle charge function.

I should not that I noticed the case do get ever so slightly warm while in use, but not overly so at all.